My Version of Ceviche Recipe

Ceviche Recipes

Did you know that Ceviche was first introduced back in the 21st century? This recipe is prominent in places such as Latin American coastal countries of the Pacific Ocean. It has been a favorite appetizer in many countries all over the world.

Ceviche (Spanish pronunciation [seˈβitʃe]) is spelt seviche or cebiche, and it is a different dish from the area of South America that its originating. It is traditionally prepared from fresh raw fish marinated in citrus juices such as lime, or lemon and spiced with chili peppers and other herbs and seasonings.

In the Philippines, we have our peculiar versions of Ceviche—Spanish colonizers or immigrants from Mexico or some parts of Latin America introduced the ceviche dish to the Filipinos, and we called this “Kinilaw” which means “eaten raw.” Ceviche is usually soaked in citrus or lime juices, unlike kinilaw which is soaked in vinegar. However, both processes will “cook” the seafood since the citrus acids change the flesh structures. The ingredients are similar but, for some reason, Filipino’s have different versions, and it depends on which part of the Philippines you live. Kinilaw is famous in the Philippines, and it’s considered an appetizer or frequently used as a side dish during beer-drinking sessions We use the word “pulutan” to describe it.

To begin with, I’ve tried all the different versions of kinilaw, which I have posted below. I certainly enjoyed preparing each one of these different versions. Accordingly, each version has its unique ingredients, and they all taste delicious. Furthermore, these dishes are effortless to prepare, since it doesn’t involve cooking or having to cook it over the fire. Also, it takes no time at all to perfect this dish either. The only drawback is that this recipe is using raw ingredients is best eaten immediately after it has been completed. Not only because it is raw and can go rancid quickly, but the flavor changes from the original taste to something that is overcooked and sour.

Tagalog version “kinilaw” Recipe

The cooking process of the kinilaw is usually soaked in vinegar which cooks the flesh, and it also reduces the “fishy smell,” and such an amazing to watch how the fish flesh switches over from luminous reddish pink to a frosty white. This particular version tastes both sweet and sour because of the green mangoes and the complimentary cucumber taste which is a little bit sweet and with a crispness.

Ingredients:
1/2 kilo of fresh Tangige(Spanish mackerel) *any fresh fish can do such as Yellow Fin tuna, tuna or deboned Bangus(Milkfish)
1 cup of vinegar *for washing to reduce fishy smell
1/3 cup of calamansi extract
1 head of red chili pepper *add more as you wish
1 stalk of onion chives *chopped
1 red onion *chopped
1/4 cup of green mango *cut into small cubes
1/4 cup of cucumber *cut into small cubes
1/2 cup of ginger, *julienned sliced or cut into small cubes
Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:
1. Gather all the ingredients.
2. In a bowl, combine the fish cubes with vinegar and set aside for 3 minutes. After that, drain the vinegar and lightly squeeze the fish using a fork to remove excess fluids.
3. At this time, combine all the remaining ingredients and mix well.
*Eat as much as soon as possible, otherwise it does not taste as fresh if you let it stand for a few hours even if you refrigerate it.
4. Can be served either with a cup of rice or as an appetizer “pulutan”, with drinks.
5. Enjoy eating.

Bicol version “kinilaw” Recipe

From the Bicol region, the Bicolano’s people have their unique ingredients. All ingredients are the same except for the fact that Bicolano’s are fascinated with coconut milk and hot peppers. In short, it becomes extra spicy and sizzles in your mouth if you are not used to the peppers. Additionally, instead of vinegar, they use coconut milk. It sounds exotic, right? Out of my curiosity, of course, I tried this recipe to assure myself about what it tastes like and how this method makes it different from others.

Ingredients:
1/2 kilo of fresh Tangige (Spanish mackerel) *any fresh fish can do such as yellowfin tuna, tuna or deboned bangus(milkfish)
1 cup of vinegar *for washing to reduce fishiness smell
1 cup of fresh coconut milk
3-5 heads of red chili pepper *add more as you wish
1 stalk of onion chives chopped
1 red onion chopped
1/2 cup of ginger, *julienned sliced or cut into cubes
Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:
1. Gather all the ingredients.
2. In a bowl, combine the fish cubes with vinegar and set aside for 3 minutes. After that, drain the vinegar and lightly squeeze the fish using the fork to remove excess fluids.
3. At this time, combine all the remaining ingredients and mix well.
*Eat when prepared because the coconut milk can be spoil quickly if not refrigerated, but not over 12 hours.
4. Can be served either with a cup of rice or served as an appetizer “pulutan”, with drinks.
5. Enjoy eating.

My version “kinilaw” Recipe

I am fascinated with all the seafood especially clams. I have my exceptional way of preparing my kinilaw version. I really adored herbs so, this is my highlight of my version. The cooking process is just similar from other versions which the fish meat relies on citrus acid or vinegar.

Ingredients:
1/2 kilo of fresh Tangige
1 cup of vinegar *for washing to reduce fishiness smell
5 heads of red chili pepper *add more as you wish
1 stalk of onion chives chopped
1 red onion chopped
1 stalk of celery
some leaves of parsley
20 leaves of arugula/rocket
3 red radish *julienned sliced or cut into cubes
1/2 cup of ginger, *julienned sliced or cut into cubes
Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:
1. Gather all the ingredients.
2. In a bowl, combine the fish cubes with vinegar and set aside for 3 minutes. After that, drain the vinegar and lightly squeeze the fish using the fork to remove excess fluids.
3. At this time, combine all the remaining ingredients and mix well.
4. Can be served either with a cup of rice or served as an appetizer “pulutan”, with drinks.
5. Enjoy eating.

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